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ABOUTACADEMICSADMISSIONSTUDENT LIFEATHLETICSALUMNAERIDINGNEWSGIVINGDIRECTORY
 

Engineering Science Curriculum

The Engineering Science curriculum is rooted in mechanical engineering and engineering design.
The program bridges the liberal arts and engineering by emphasizing not only the key technical aspects of engineering but also the vital benefits engineering has on society. The global and societal context of engineering solutions are emphasized through the implementation of designs outside of the U.S.

The Sweet Briar BS in Engineering Science is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 tel 410-347-7700.

The Engineering Science Major (B.S.)
(80 semester hours)

Required:
BUSN 326    (3)    Project Selection and Management
CHEM 131    (3)    General Chemistry
CHEM 141    (1)    General Chemistry Laboratory
ENGR 110    (4)    Designing Our World: An Introduction to Engineering Design
ENGR 120    (3)    Analyzing Our World: Foundations of Engineering Analysis
ENGR 205    (3)    Statics and Strength of Materials
ENGR 206    (3)    Dynamics and Kinematics
ENGR 215    (4)    Materials Science and Engineering
ENGR 221    (4)    Electrical Circuits
ENGR 307    (4)    Thermal and Fluid Systems
ENGR 316    (3)    Signals and Systems
ENGR 331    (3)    Machine Design
ENGR 378    (1)    Engineering Co-op
ENGR 415    (4)    Systems Modeling and Controls
ENGR 424    (3)    Mechatronics
MATH 123    (4)    Calculus I
MATH 124    (3)    Calculus II
MATH 205    (3)    Applied Statistics
MATH 223    (3)    Calculus III
MATH 328    (3)    Ordinary Differential Equations
PHYS 132    (1)    General Physics II Laboratory
PHYS 171    (4)     General Physics I
PHYS 172    (3)    General Physics II
PHYS 215    (1)    Matlab Programming

Senior Exercises:
ENGR 451    (3)    Capstone Design

Choose 1 of the following courses:
ENGR 230    (3)    Technology and Society: A Regional Perspective
ENGR 232    (3)    Technology and Society: A Global Perspective

Choose 1 additional three-credit ENGR course at the 200-level or above.


NOTES: With the exception of ENGR 261, ENGR 361, ENGR 378, and ENGR 461, no course used to fulfill major requirements may be taken on a P/CR/NC grading option.

Including the required credits from CHEM, MATH, and PHYS above, majors must complete 32 credits selected from BIOL (excluding BIOL 103), CHEM (excluding CHEM 119, 120, and 125), MATH (excluding MATH 106, 113, 211, and 213), PHYS (excluding PHYS 113, 114, and 122), and ENVR 143, 203, 244, 309, and 433.

 

ENGR 110

Designing Our World: An Introduction to Engineering Design
CR: 
 4.0

This course emphasizes the design process – the process by which engineers approach problem-solving. Mechanisms are designed, built, and tested via active student participation in hands-on team projects. Students conduct experiments, apply underlying scientific principles, and analyze and present data. Underlying themes include teamwork, communication, optimization, design trade-offs, and decisionmaking. Intended for first and second year students. III.Q, V.8ab

ENGR 120

Analyzing Our World: Foundations of Engineering Analysis
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 123. This course focuses on developing proficiency in analytical approaches and techniques used by engineers in problem solving and design. Topics include solid modeling and engineering drawing using Inventor, structured programming and basic numerical methods using Matlab, and data manipulation using Excel. A cooperative learning approach will be used to encourage student interaction in and out of the classroom. III.Q

ENGR 205

Statics and Strength of Materials
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: MATH 124 and PHYS 171. This course focuses on static force analysis. Students will study stresses, two- and three-dimensional force systems, equilibrium, structures, distributed forces, shear and bending moment diagrams, and friction. The course will also emphasize strength and elastic deflection of engineering materials due to loads applied axially, in torsion, in bending, and in shear.

ENGR 206

Dynamics and Kinematics
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: ENGR 205, MATH 124, and PHYS 171. This course focuses on the application of vector algebra, matrix algebra, and freebody diagrams to the solution of two- and three-dimensional problems in rigid-body dynamics. The course covers motion of particles, motion of particle systems, mass center and moments of inertia, planar kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies, and work-energy and impulse-momentum methods.

ENGR 215

Materials Science and Engineering
CR: 
 4.0

Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and CHEM 141. This course investigates relationships between microstructural characteristics of engineering materials and their macroscopic properties. The importance of defects in affecting material properties, methods of modifying properties, and manufacturing processes are studied. Particular emphasis is placed on the ability to select a combination of material and manufacturing process that is suitable for a specific engineering application. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. III.W

ENGR 221

Electrical Circuits
CR: 
 4.0

Prerequisites: PHYS 132 and PHYS 172. This course introduces the fundamental principles and the mathematical techniques used to analyze and model analog and digital circuits including energy storage elements. Course topics include resistive circuits, alternating current circuits, transient analysis, operational amplifier circuits, transistors, diodes, digital systems, and instrumentation. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

ENGR 230

Technology and Society: A Regional Perspective
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. This course involves interdisciplinary teams of faculty and students considering cultural concepts such as race, class, and gender, along with investigating relevant contemporary economic and political institutions, in designing solutions to real-world problems within economically disadvantaged areas of the U.S. In making design decisions, students are encouraged to view the problems holistically, considering the various perspectives of the disciplines involved. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. V.5, V.7

ENGR 232

Technology and Society: A Global Perspective
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. This course involves interdisciplinary teams of faculty and students considering cultural aspects of a developing world society - generally Latin America or the Caribbean - along with investigating relevant contemporary economic and political institutions, in designing solutions to real-world problems. In making design decisions, students are encouraged to view the problems holistically, considering the various perspectives of the disciplines involved. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. V.4, V.7

ENGR 235

Technology and Society: Implementation
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGR 230 or ENGR 232. This course involves on-site implementation of the design solutions developed by interdisciplinary teams of faculty and students in either ENGR 230 or ENGR 232. The teams will implement their solutions at the project site for a minimum of two weeks. An example would be building a reservoir and piping distribution system to address the water needs of an isolated Appalachian community.

ENGR 261

Directed Study
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: One ENGR course and permission of the instructor. The study of introductory level material by an individual student or by a small group of students under the immediate supervision of a faculty member.

ENGR 307

Thermal and Fluid Systems
CR: 
 4.0

Prerequisites: MATH 124 and PHYS 171. This course introduces the fundamental laws of mass, momentum, and energy transport in thermal and fluid systems. Topics include thermodynamic and transport properties, conservation principles, fluid statics, internal and external fluid flow and heat transfer, mixtures, and chemical separation processes. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

ENGR 316

Signals and Systems
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: ENGR 221, MATH 328, and PHYS 215. This course focuses on analyzing signals and systems with applications to control, communications, and signal processing. Topics covered include representation of signals, linear time-invariant systems, Fourier analysis of signals, input/output analysis, and Laplace transforms and principles. Practical examples are emphasized and computer techniques are employed.

ENGR 323

Finite Element Analysis
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGR 205. The finite element method is a numerical procedure for solving problems in continuum mechanics. This course emphasizes stress analysis and structural mechanics. The method is also applied to problems in heat transfer, fluid flow, and electric fields. The course emphasizes a hands-on approach based on solving real engineering problems using the ANSYS software package. Offered alternate years.

ENGR 328

Special Topics in Engineering

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The study of an intermediate or advanced topic not normally covered in orther engineering courses. Topic will vary by semester. Topic for Fall 2011: "Soil Mechanics." This course introduces the fundamental properties and behavior of soil as an engineering material. Subjects to be studied include soil formation, physical properties, water-flow through soils, capillarity, seepage, stresses, shear strength, lateral pressure, and bearing capacity. Hands-on soil identification and property testing along with design problems will be emphasized.

ENGR 331

Machine Design
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGR 205. Students learn to design and select mechanical components and to predict component performance. Topics include shear and bending stresses in beams, beam deflections, column buckling, planar combined loading, static failure, fatigue failure, and surface failure. Specific component types, such as fasteners, springs, bearings, gears, brakes, and shafts are covered. Finite-element tools are utilized for linear elastic stress analysis. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

ENGR 361

Special Study
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: 100-level ENGR course and permission of the instructor. The study of an intermediate level topic by an individual student or by a small group of students under the immediate supervision of a faculty member.

ENGR 361

Special Study
CR: 
 2.0

Prerequisites: 100-level ENGR course and permission of the instructor. The study of an intermediate level topic by an individual student or by a small group of students under the immediate supervision of a faculty member.

ENGR 361

Special Study
CR: 
 1.0

Prerequisites: 100-level ENGR course and permission of the instructor. The study of an intermediate level topic by an individual student or by a small group of students under the immediate supervision of a faculty member.

ENGR 378

Engineering Co-op
CR: 
 1.0

Prerequisites: ENGR 120 and sophomore standing. Students will learn through hands-on experience obtained in an industrial or research setting with practicing engineers. Students receive one hour of co-op credit for 8 weeks of full-time, paid employment that has been approved by the engineering faculty. The student’s work is evaluated by the employer and by an engineering faculty member through reports and presentations. This course is graded P/CR/NC only.

ENGR 411

Thermal and Chemical Energy Applications
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGR 307. This course applies the principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and chemical engineering to topics in energy. Topics include energy conservation in building heating and cooling, refrigeration and air conditioning systems, solar and wind energy, and electric/hybrid vehicles.

ENGR 415

Systems Modeling and Controls
CR: 
 4.0

Prerequisite: ENGR 316. This course focuses on developing and analyzing models that describe input/output behavior of physical systems. Topics include transfer functions, frequency response, time/frequency domains, transient and time constant, rootlocus, bode plots, and feedback control design. Laboratory consists of design, analysis, construction, and testing of electrical and electromechanical circuits and devices. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

ENGR 424

Mechatronics
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisite: ENGR 415. This course focuses on designing systems by integrating mechanical, electrical, and control systems engineering. Topics covered include: electromechanical sensors, actuators, DA and AD convertors, and data acquisition methods. Digital control methods and microprocessors will be introduced in class and used to design and conduct experiments. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

ENGR 426

Robotics
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: ENGR 206, MATH 328, and PHYS 215. The field of robotics is concerned with the design of electromechanical systems to assist or substitute for human effort. Typically, a robot has four fundamental capabilities: manipulation, locomotion, perception, and intelligence. This course focuses on all of these areas. Topics include spatial transformations, inverse kinematics, differential motions, dynamic force analysis, trajectory generation, actuation, sensing, and autonomous control.

ENGR 436

Communications Systems
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: ENGR 221, MATH 328, and PHYS 215. This course focuses on the elements of communication systems including filtering and signal to noise ratios; baseband communication systems; quantizing and digital modulation including error rates; analog modulation including noise performance; correlated noise generation; memory modulation schemes; and frequency and time multiplexing. MATLAB is utilized throughout the course in conjunction with SIMULINK to analyze, program, and design optimal communications systems.

ENGR 451

Capstone Design
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: ENGR 307, ENGR 331, and ENGR 415. Engineering seniors, operating in design teams, apply principles of the design process to create aproduct or process to meet the needs of a customer. Projects may originate in industry, as a contest sponsored by a professional society, or in other venues. Design projects usually result in a deliverable prototype. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory. III.O, III.W

ENGR 461

Independent Study
CR: 
 3.0

Prerequisites: One 100-level ENGR course, one 200-level ENGR course, and permission of the instructor. Pursuit of an upper level research project determined in advance by the student in consultation with a faculty member who will act as the sponsor.

ENGR 461

Independent Study
CR: 
 2.0

Prerequisites: One 100-level ENGR course, one 200-level ENGR course, and permission of the instructor. Pursuit of an upper level research project determined in advance by the student in consultation with a faculty member who will act as the sponsor.

ENGR 461

Independent Study
CR: 
 1.0

Prerequisites: One 100-level ENGR course, one 200-level ENGR course, and permission of the instructor. Pursuit of an upper level research project determined in advance by the student in consultation with a faculty member who will act as the sponsor.